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Theatre Appreciation Courses

ACTING FOR NON-MAJORS
FAM 1001 – 50523: (Monday/Wednesday 1-2:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001 – 51234: (Monday/Wednesday 6-7:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001 – 50524: (Monday/Wednesday 4-5:20 p.m.)
FAM 1001 – 53969: (Monday/Wednesday 2:30-3:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, FA Fine Arts
An introductory course in the craft of acting designed for university students interested in theatre performance. Students will work on unscripted material in group improvisations and scripted material in the presentation of monologues or scenes. Basic actor vocabulary common to all styles of performance will be taught.
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ACTING FOR NON-MAJORS II GRADUATE
FAM 6002 – 51058: (Monday/Friday 9:50-11:10 a.m.)
A continuation of FAM6001, Acting for Non-Majors. This course will focus more on scripted material or more highly structured improvisatory situations than FAM6001. Students will continue to learn basic actor terminology, especially as it relates to the analysis of texts for character development. Emphasis will also continue to be placed on helping the novice actor perform with physical freedom and vocal ease. While FAM6001 is not a formal prerequisite for this course, past acting experience is highly recommended before taking this class.
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INTRODUCTION TO MAKEUP
THPR 1010 – 52749: 
(Tuesday/Thursday 3:30-4:50 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy
A one semester course for students who desire more than an overview into the art of makeup. This course is designed to teach the student about the bones and muscles of their own face, and what needs to be done to change their look, their age, and their expression. The course covers bone structure, corrective makeup, age makeup and various facial expressions. Script and character analysis is required as part of the final project.
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INTRODUCTION TO STAGE DESIGN AND PROPERTIES
THPR 2050 – 49129: (Monday/Friday 10:10 a.m.-12:10 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CT Critical Thinking, KI Knowledge Integration, FA Fine Arts
This course covers basic scenic design skills and methods; and introduces topics in stage properties for the entertainment industry. Through lectures, practical application and theoretical projects students will learn to analyze, research, produce and manage stage props.
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SCRIPT ANALYSIS
DRPF 1050 – 48860: (Monday/Wednesday/Friday 12:20-1:15 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, FA Fine Arts, SE Social & Ethical Issues
All students will learn to use the Aristotelian theory of drama to analyze plays. Students will develop a methodology to merge their own points of view with given material in order to create and articulate a nuanced, personal and concrete concept for production. In addition to the six elements of Aristotelian drama (Plot, Character, Thought, Diction, Music, Spectacle), students will learn how different playwrights manipulate other dramatic practices and tools (Metaphor, Scenography, Direct Address, Casting the Audience, Found Material, Stasis/Intrusion, etc.). Students will approach text analysis from their area of study (acting, technical direction, design, etc.) as well as from the point of view of a director. In the final unit of the course, we will explore film analysis and apply what we’ve learned about Aristotelian structure to screenwriting and directing. Graduate students will also explore Brechtian text analysis, creating fables that summarize key events and identify and articulate the social project of the play.
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SCRIPT ANAYSIS
DRPF 7050 – 48862: (Monday/Wednesday/Friday 12:20-1:15 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CT Critical Thinking, IL Information Literacy, FA Fine Arts, SE Social & Ethical Issues
All students will learn to use the Aristotelian theory of drama to analyze plays. Students will develop a methodology to merge their own points of view with given material in order to create and articulate a nuanced, personal and concrete concept for production. In addition to the six elements of Aristotelian drama (Plot, Character, Thought, Diction, Music, Spectacle), students will learn how different playwrights manipulate other dramatic practices and tools (Metaphor, Scenography, Direct Address, Casting the Audience, Found Material, Stasis/Intrusion, etc.). Students will approach text analysis from their area of study (acting, technical direction, design, etc.) as well as from the point of view of a director. In the final unit of the course, we will explore film analysis and apply what we’ve learned about Aristotelian structure to screenwriting and directing. Graduate students will also explore Brechtian text analysis, creating fables that summarize key events and identify and articulate the social project of the play.
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STAGE LIGHTING LAB & CREW FOR NON-MAJORS
THPR 1018C – 50642: (Friday 10:10-11:05 a.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: CM Effective Communication, CT Critical Thinking, FA Fine Arts
Practical production undergraduate crew work in the execution of stage lighting designs for major opera, musical theatre, dance and dramatic productions. Each student will practice their understanding in accomplishing the execution of a realized lighting design project(s). Non-typical work session hours required (evening and weekends) for installation and running crews for productions. May be repeated for credit.
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THEATRE HISTORY II FOR NON-MAJORS
DRPF 2055 – 50281: (Monday/Wednesday/Friday 11:15 a.m.-12:10 p.m.)
DRPF 2055 – 50282: (Monday/Wednesday/Friday 2:30-3:25 p.m.)
Breadth of Knowledge Areas: FA Fine Arts, HP Historical Perspectives, CT Critical Thinking
History of Theatre is a chronological look at the rise of Western theatre from the Spanish Golden Age to the present. The course examines how theatre emerges, its dramatic structure, styles of acting, various visual elements and different production techniques. The course also explores how theatre artisans built upon the experiences of one another, introduces key figures from theatre history and shows how theatre continues to influence us today.
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Registration Info

UC students can register online at webapps2.uc.edu/ScheduleOfClasses.